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Energy and Environment Cabinet

Electric meter

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Energy Saving Tips for the Home

Tips for the Home - Summer
  • Keep your central air conditioning system well tuned. A well-tuned air conditioning system operates more efficiently, using less energy.
  • Closing blinds and drapes during hot days can reduce air conditioning demand by keeping out sun and heat. Windows facing south let in the most heat.
  • Lights, televisions, computers and appliances not only use electricity, they generate heat. Keep them turned off when not in use.
  • Use appliances such as ovens, dishwashers and clothes dryers early in the day or late in the evening, when temperatures are cooler.
  • Use your microwave instead of your stove and oven. It generates less heat.
  • Use fans to supplement room or central air conditioning. They do not lower air temperatures, but the breeze they produce makes it feel cooler. Fans use less electricity than air conditioners.
  • Use the exhaust fans in your bathroom sparingly. In just one hour they can remove a houseful of cooled air.
  • Install a ceiling fan. Ceiling fans use about 98 percent less energy than most central air conditioners.
  • Put a timer on your room air conditioner, or use a programmable thermostat on your central air conditioner.
  • Change the air filter in your furnace each month. Air conditioners use more energy when the filter is full of dust.  
  • Use a compact fluorescent bulb. It uses about one-fourth the energy an incandescent uses with the same light quality and lasts 10 times as long.
  • Low-flow shower heads reduce water use by 50 percent or more. A standard shower head uses about five to seven gallons of water per minute.
  • Cool Your World with "ENERGY STAR at Home"
  • Energy Savers (USDOE)

Tips for the Home - Winter

  •  Energy Star Home Adviser
  • Change the air filter in your furnace each month. Heaters use more energy when the filter is full of dust.
  • Use your blinds or drapes. Open them on sunny winter days to let warm sun in; close them on winter nights to keep the heat in.
  • Insulate hot water tanks, hot water pipes and heating ducts.
  • Caulking and weather-stripping your home can result in energy savings of 10 percent or more.
  • Seal holes where conduits and pipes enter the attic and along walls, eaves, and knee walls. Use caulk or compressed fiberglass insulation.
  • Contact your local utility about a home energy audit. Many utilities offer audits for a small fee ($15-$40).
  • Conduct a do-it-yourself home energy audit. 
  • Use compact fluorescent bulbs. They use about one-fourth the energy an incandescent uses with the same light quality and last 10 times as long.
  • Low-flow shower heads reduce water use by 50 percent or more - a standard shower head uses about five to seven gallons of water per minute.
  • Simple Savings Bulletins 
  • Energy Savers - Heating (USDOE)
  • Stay Warm, Save Money  
  • Energy Saving Tips from "Flex Your Power"